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Fit Babe (week 21)

I've always had an on-off relationship with the gym. More off than on to be honest. However, I was really good in the run up to getting "up the duff". I measure "good" by my own standards… I was going to a class once a week, maybe twice if I was feeling particularly energetic. (Jess Ennis can rest easy.)
Once we had news of the stork I was a little nervous about whether I should continue.

I had a chat with my GP and also spoke to a friend who is a personal trainer to check that I wasn't going to hurt little one. (I was half hoping they would prescribe an exercise routine of channel surfing and warn me off Zumba and Boot Camp).

No such luck. Both told me the same thing. Exercise is good. Good for me. Good for baby. Good for world peace blah blah blah. I just have to choose my activities wisely, take extra care, and put the Desperate Housewives boxset back on the shelf.

I am keen to have as straight forward a pregnancy and delivery as possible so I have been pretty good and [sort of] followed their advice so far. I'm also hoping that if I keep active it will be a bit easier to lose the mummy tummy afterwards.

The intentions were good. I bought a pre and post natal workout DVD (which actually isn't half bad) and have been going for walks in the country and occasionally going to a gym class. It is all a bit of a juggling act though. It doesn't feel as straight forward as it sounds. I'm a bit more tired than usual (not helped by the fact that I find myself waking up early at weekends). I'm managing a proper activity once a week. I feel OK with it so hope this should be enough to keep my stamina up for labour.

Clinical Comment

 

 Simon Mehigan Consultant Midwife

Getting pregnant isn't a reason to abandon any exercise regime you may have and as your GP and friend have said it is actually good for you. We don't recommend you suddenly training for a marathon if you have never run before or going to the gym everyday if it's not what you were doing pre-pregnancy.

Listen to your body; if you get aches and pains then it's your body's way of telling you that you might have done too much. It does not mean you should stop all together. You might just have to slow the pace of your exercise down, particularly as your pregnancy progresses.

Yoga, pilates, swimming and aquanatal are all great in pregnancy. Make sure you let your instructor know you are pregnant so they can advise you of anything to avoid doing.

Do you have a question for Anna or Simon? If so please email us at Feedback@lwh.nhs.uk or alternively use the feedback tool at the bottom of this page.

  • Read Anna's previous blogs

    I've always had an on-off relationship with the gym. More off than on to be honest. However, I was really good in the run up to getting "up the duff". I measure "good" by my own standards… I was going to a class once a week, maybe twice if I was feeling particularly energetic. (Jess Ennis can rest easy.)
    Once we had news of the stork I was a little nervous about whether I should continue.

    I had a chat with my GP and also spoke to a friend who is a personal trainer to check that I wasn't going to hurt little one. (I was half hoping they would prescribe an exercise routine of channel surfing and warn me off Zumba and Boot Camp).

    No such luck. Both told me the same thing. Exercise is good. Good for me. Good for baby. Good for world peace blah blah blah. I just have to choose my activities wisely, take extra care, and put the Desperate Housewives boxset back on the shelf.

    I am keen to have as straight forward a pregnancy and delivery as possible so I have been pretty good and [sort of] followed their advice so far. I'm also hoping that if I keep active it will be a bit easier to lose the mummy tummy afterwards.

    The intentions were good. I bought a pre and post natal workout DVD (which actually isn't half bad) and have been going for walks in the country and occasionally going to a gym class. It is all a bit of a juggling act though. It doesn't feel as straight forward as it sounds. I'm a bit more tired than usual (not helped by the fact that I find myself waking up early at weekends). I'm managing a proper activity once a week. I feel OK with it so hope this should be enough to keep my stamina up for labour.

    Clinical Comment


     Simon Mehigan Consultant Midwife

    Getting pregnant isn't a reason to abandon any exercise regime you may have and as your GP and friend have said it is actually good for you. We don't recommend you suddenly training for a marathon if you have never run before or going to the gym everyday if it's not what you were doing pre-pregnancy.

    Listen to your body; if you get aches and pains then it's your body's way of telling you that you might have done too much. It does not mean you should stop all together. You might just have to slow the pace of your exercise down, particularly as your pregnancy progresses.

    Yoga, pilates, swimming and aquanatal are all great in pregnancy. Make sure you let your instructor know you are pregnant so they can advise you of anything to avoid doing.

    Do you have a question for Anna or Simon? If so please email us at Feedback@lwh.nhs.uk or alternively use the feedback tool at the bottom of this page.

by Anna

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